Women Rock Artboard

Are you ready to rock? Today is Women Rock Day, which draws attention to the female rockers who have helped shape the rock ‘n’ roll genre. A few of these sirens first took the stage here in Illinois. Read on to learn more about the talented Illinois women who have stepped behind the microphone to make music, break stereotypes and contribute their voices to history.

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Gabriella Boros is our October Artist of the Month from Skokie, Illinois. For the past eight years Gabriella has beeen relishing woodblock printmaking which she defines as her favorite medium to work in. Gabriella's paintings have been viewed not only in Illinois but internationally as well.

How long have you been an artist or when did you start?

I have been creating art in one way or another since my earliest memory. There never was a period when I did not paint, draw or in some way express myself artistically.

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Biki Biki Chaplain is our September Artist of the Month. Orginally from Texas, Chaplain moved to Southern Illinois in the 1960's. Although she has worked in many mediums throughout the years her favorite to work in is oil because of the quality of the color.

How long have you been an artist or when did you start?

Apparently, I was an artist long before I realized that I was one. In high school, one of my classmates remembered she had gone to school with me in the second grade and remembered me as the girl who could draw the beautiful birds. However, it wasn’t until college that I considered myself an artist.

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ILI West Loop ChicagoKumiko, a cozy, Japanese-inspired restaurant and bar nestled in Chicago’s West Loop neighborhood, has been named one of the World’s Greatest Places of 2019 by TIME Magazine.

TIME’s list annually spotlights the 100 most noteworthy museums, hotels, parks and restaurants from all over the world. TIME selected Kumiko based on its innovative cocktail menu, which is influenced by co-owner and beverage director Julia Momose’s Japanese heritage. Patrons can enjoy a drink alongside steam buns, short ribs and other small plates crafted from Japanese ingredients by chef Noah Sandoval.

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SoybeansA marker commemorating the first soybeans ever planted in Illinois was placed at the Louis and Clark Community College in Alton, Illinois nearly 167 years after John Lee of Alton helped them take root.

However, Lee did not receive this crop by ordinary means. Illinois’ long history with soybeans begins 500 miles off the coast of Japan in 1950, after a shipwrecked Junk stranded 17 Japanese sailors at sea.

The group was transported to San Francisco after the North American freighter Auckland rescued them from the wreck. Among the survivors was Joseph Heco, pictured left, who later became the first Japanese person to be naturalized as a United States citizen. A chest of goods he and his shipmates brought from the wreck contained the very first soybeans that Illinois would see.

At the time, Alton resident Dr. Benjamin Franklin Edwards was residing in San Francisco. Like many others during this time, Edwards was drawn to California by the gold rush.

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